IN THE CLASSROOM


Learn about roles and responsibilities across health professions, through active learning opportunities.

The opportunities below provide students exposure to the roles/responsibilities of other health professions, while learning about topics that are of interest across health professions. The events listed on this page are approved IPE curricular activities by the six health science schools for the 2019-20 academic year.  Click “Learn More” to read about the various active learning opportunities, and to register. Space is limited for each of these events. Note: “IP” means interprofessional.

If you are inspired by the idea of learning outside of your disciplinary silo, explore our curated list of interprofessional course electives offered across the health sciences and beyond! 

Oct 16, 2019, 5:30-7:30pm

Bodemer IP Ethics Lab: Ethics in Caring for the Incarcerated Patient

Ethical Complexities of Caring for Patients who are Incarcerated

When a patient is a suspect of a crime or is incarcerated, clinicians are faced with the ethical dilemma of how to care for a patient who should not to be cared for any differently than any other patient, but who, because of legal restraints on their rights, is different. This Ethics Lab will include a presentation by visiting scholar, Kahlia Kéita, MA, JD, who will detail the challenges faced by clinicians, including issues of consent, privacy & confidentiality, maintaining dignity of the patient, and safety. The session will illustrate how education, policy, and training may aid clinicians in navigating care for these patients. Students will also have the opportunity to engage with interprofessional teams to work through a challenging case related to the topic. 

Click here to register.

This session was developed in collaboration with faculty from UW Department of Bioethics and Humanities (Gina Campbelia, PhD), MedStar Washington Hospital Center (Kahlia Keita, MA, MD), and is supported by the Bodemer Lecture Fund.

Nov 1, 2019, 3:00-5:00pm

IP Team-Based Care of Patients with Chronic Pain who Use Opioids

Interprofessional Team-Based Care of Patients with Chronic Pain who Use Opioids

The purpose of this workshop is to provide an interprofessional learning opportunity for students from different health professions to collaborate and practice using a team approach when caring for a patient who is taking opioid medications.  Interprofessional teams will apply skills in the following areas:  assessment of a patient with chronic pain who is taking opioids; interpretation of results from screening and diagnostic tools for pain and/or opioid use disorder; identification of treatment options for management  of chronic pain and/or opioid use disorder including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches; development of a patient centered plan of care; and opioid overdose prevention.  Participants will have an opportunity to discuss professional roles and responsibilities, use of non-stigmatizing language, and how team-based care may improve outcomes for patients with chronic pain who may be at risk for opioid use disorder. 

Click here to register.

This IP opioid education curriculum was developed by faculty from Washington State University Health Sciences in collaboration with the Washington State Department of Health. Visiting WSU faculty, Brenda Bray, BPharm, MPH, and Marian Wilson, PhD, MPH, RN-BC will facilitate the session.

Nov 15, 2019, 3:00-5:00pm

Collaborative Approaches to Caring for Veterans

Collaborative Approaches to Caring for Veterans

Ten percent of American adults have served in the military, but less than half receive their healthcare through the VA. It is important for providers in the community to have a basic understanding of available resources and barriers confronted by this population. During the session students will learn about the impacts of military service and culture on veterans, and will focus on how health care providers across professions can collaborate to provide high quality care for veterans. 

Click here to register.

This session was created in collaboration with clinicians from the Seattle Division of VA Puget Sound Health Care System.

Jan 13, 2020, 10:00am-12:00pm

Managing Acute Pain in Persons w/ Opioid Use Disorder

Managing Acute Pain in Persons with Opioid Use Disorders

Managing acute pain and coexisting opioid use disorder can be challenging for both patents and healthcare teams. A team-based approach to assessment and management can increase patient satisfaction, avoid dangerous medication side effects and interactions, and decrease patient and provider frustration. In this session, students have the opportunity to discuss their own professional perspective and the challenges in communication and teamwork while working together on a case. Students will also consider the multi-level factors the influence the treatment of pain and the current opioid epidemic. 

Click here to register.

The session was developed in collaboration with faculty from the Harborview Integrated Pain Care Program (Deborah Gordon, ARNP; Jared Klein, MD).

Jan 24, 2020, 3:00-5:00pm

Effective Patient-Provider Communication for Patients with Communication Disorders

Effective Patient-Provider Communication for Patients w/ Communication Disorders

Patients with speech, language, and hearing impairments are a vulnerable population in healthcare, at higher risk for medical errors and complications, as well as loss of autonomy due to barriers posed by their communication disorders. While many health professions may not be involved in the diagnosis and management of communication disorders, most all healthcare providers will at various times in their career interact with patients who have communication disorders. In this session students will learn quick tools and strategies to use to meet the goals of patient-centered care and shared-decision-making when communication needs to be done differently to accommodate a communication disorder.  

Click here to register.

This session was developed by faculty from the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine (Carolyn Baylor, PhD) and Speech and Hearing Sciences (Michael Burns, PhD).

Feb 11, 2020, 5:30-7:30pm

Bodemer IP Ethics Lab: When Patients Decline Recommended Medical Care

When Patients Decline Recommended Medical Care

This interprofessional ethics lab focuses on applying key approaches of clinical ethics to cases in which patients refuse recommendations by their healthcare team. Students will consider the influence of factors such as patient decisional capacity, cultural/religious beliefs, patient preferences, and trust in the healthcare system. Ethics Consultants and clinicians from UW Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center will help guide small group discussion using some of the language, principles, and tools that guide bioethicists. 

Click here to register.

This session was developed in collaboration with faculty from UW Department of Bioethics and Humanities (Gina Campbelia, PhD), and is supported by the Bodemer Lecture Fund.

April 6, 2020, 5:30-7:30pm

Bodemer IP Ethics Lab: Developmental, Legal and Ethical Considerations of Adolescent Decision-Making

Developmental, Legal and Ethical Considerations of Adolescent Decision-Making

This interprofessional ethics lab addresses adolescents as decision-makers. The session will cover the basics of neurocognitive development, the legal rights of minors, and the pertinent ethical considerations of adolescents making decisions for themselves. Ethics consultants and clinicians from Seattle Children’s and UW Medical Center will help guide small group case discussions using some of the language, principles, and tools that guide bioethicists. 

Click here to register.

This session was developed in collaboration with faculty from UW Department of Bioethics and Humanities (Gina Campbelia, PhD) and Seattle Children’s Hospital (Leah Kroon, RN, MA), and is supported by the Bodemer Lecture Fund.

April 17, 2020, 3:00-5:00pm

Weight Stigma in Clinical Care

Weight Stigma in Clinical Care

In this session, small interprofessional groups of students will work together to discuss and evaluate the issue of weight stigma in health care. This will be done by increasing self-awareness of weight bias, reviewing research showing the health-impacts of internalized and externalized weight stigma on health behaviors and healthcare utilization, and discussing clinical scenarios students are likely to encounter. Participants will evaluate and discuss stigma-related concerns in three recent public health campaigns, and hear two patient narratives discussing the impact of weight stigma on their healthcare experiences. 

Click here to register.

This session was developed by faculty from Nutritional Sciences (Michelle Averill, PhD) and Social Work (Erin Harrop, MSW, PhDc).

May 1, 2020, 3:00-5:00pm

A “One Health” Clinic for Persons Experiencing Homelessness with their Animals

A One Health Approach to Persons Experiencing Homelessness with their Animals

The health aspects of homeless people experiencing homelessness with their animals require an interprofessional approach. How can human health care practitioners collaborate with social environmental health professionals, mental health professionals, and veterinarians to offer innovative services to people experiencing homelessness with their animals? During this session students will learn about the approach to care in a “One Health Clinic” where interprofessional teams collaborate in this way, treating both the humans and the animals at the same time and sharing information between professionals to optimize care. 

Click here to register.

This session was developed in collaboration with faculty from the UW Center for One Health Research (Peter Rabinowitz, MD, MPH; Vickie Ramirez, MS).